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Faith Works

A Study In The Book Of James

Faith In Our Prayers (BG)

August 29, 2021 • Jon Siebert • James 5:13–20, 2 Corinthians 12:7–10, 1 John 5:14, Luke 18:10–14

The act of praying helps us remember Who is in control (hint, it isn’t us) and strengthens our faith. If you remember, James instructs his fellow believers to pray when facing trials, trusting fully that God will answer and provide what they need (1:5). But he doesn’t stop at prayer during trials. James ends his letter by urging readers to sing praises when they are cheerful. We give thanks to God for what He has done, which strengthens our endurance as we remember His faithfulness to us. As we rejoice in the hope of God’s goodness, we are increasingly able to find patience in our trials because our eyes are on Jesus. We are also called to pray with others when we are sick or find that our faith is weak; the encouragement of believers gathered together in Jesus’ name asking God for healing and strength, is a great help to the one in need. Prayer is powerful because God is all-powerful. God hears our prayers.

Faith In Our Prayers (WS)

August 29, 2021 • Kenan Stolz • James 5:13–20

The act of praying helps us remember Who is in control (hint, it isn’t us) and strengthens our faith. If you remember, James instructs his fellow believers to pray when facing trials, trusting fully that God will answer and provide what they need (1:5). But he doesn’t stop at prayer during trials. James ends his letter by urging readers to sing praises when they are cheerful. We give thanks to God for what He has done, which strengthens our endurance as we remember His faithfulness to us. As we rejoice in the hope of God’s goodness, we are increasingly able to find patience in our trials because our eyes are on Jesus. We are also called to pray with others when we are sick or find that our faith is weak; the encouragement of believers gathered together in Jesus’ name asking God for healing and strength, is a great help to the one in need. Prayer is powerful because God is all-powerful. God hears our prayers.

Faith In Our Prayers (HP)

August 29, 2021 • Michael Hearn • James 5:13–20, Hebrews 11:35–38, 1 Thessalonians 4:13–18, Matthew 24:36–44, 1 Peter 4:7–11

The act of praying helps us remember Who is in control (hint, it isn’t us) and strengthens our faith. If you remember, James instructs his fellow believers to pray when facing trials, trusting fully that God will answer and provide what they need (1:5). But he doesn’t stop at prayer during trials. James ends his letter by urging readers to sing praises when they are cheerful. We give thanks to God for what He has done, which strengthens our endurance as we remember His faithfulness to us. As we rejoice in the hope of God’s goodness, we are increasingly able to find patience in our trials because our eyes are on Jesus. We are also called to pray with others when we are sick or find that our faith is weak; the encouragement of believers gathered together in Jesus’ name asking God for healing and strength, is a great help to the one in need. Prayer is powerful because God is all-powerful. God hears our prayers.

Faith For Tomorrow (BG)

August 22, 2021 • Jon Siebert • James 4:13—5:6

In this section, James addresses two categories of sin: sins of omission and sins of commission. A sin of omission is the failure to act while sins of commission are sinful actions. Christians are called to live directed by the knowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, He is currently ruling and reigning, and He will return one day for His Bride, the Church. What does sin have to do with this? When we lose eternal perspective, we tend to stop acting the way we should (sins of omission) and start acting in ways we should not (sins of commission). Is your life guided by personal pursuit of happiness, or is it motivated by Christ’s return? Our planning, amassing of goods, and our treatment of others should all be driven by the truth. God sees our motives, our lack of action and outright sin, and holds us accountable for it all. This should serve to both urge us to evaluate where we place our hope and what drives our hearts, as well as comfort those who are overlooked. God sees, He is in control, and Christ is returning for His Church!

Faith For Tomorrow (WS)

August 22, 2021 • Kenan Stolz • James 4:13—5:6

In this section, James addresses two categories of sin: sins of omission and sins of commission. A sin of omission is the failure to act while sins of commission are sinful actions. Christians are called to live directed by the knowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, He is currently ruling and reigning, and He will return one day for His Bride, the Church. What does sin have to do with this? When we lose eternal perspective, we tend to stop acting the way we should (sins of omission) and start acting in ways we should not (sins of commission). Is your life guided by personal pursuit of happiness, or is it motivated by Christ’s return? Our planning, amassing of goods, and our treatment of others should all be driven by the truth. God sees our motives, our lack of action and outright sin, and holds us accountable for it all. This should serve to both urge us to evaluate where we place our hope and what drives our hearts, as well as comfort those who are overlooked. God sees, He is in control, and Christ is returning for His Church!

Faith For Tomorrow (HP)

August 22, 2021 • Michael Hearn • James 4:13—5:6

In this section, James addresses two categories of sin: sins of omission and sins of commission. A sin of omission is the failure to act while sins of commission are sinful actions. Christians are called to live directed by the knowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, He is currently ruling and reigning, and He will return one day for His Bride, the Church. What does sin have to do with this? When we lose eternal perspective, we tend to stop acting the way we should (sins of omission) and start acting in ways we should not (sins of commission). Is your life guided by personal pursuit of happiness, or is it motivated by Christ’s return? Our planning, amassing of goods, and our treatment of others should all be driven by the truth. God sees our motives, our lack of action and outright sin, and holds us accountable for it all. This should serve to both urge us to evaluate where we place our hope and what drives our hearts, as well as comfort those who are overlooked. God sees, He is in control, and Christ is returning for His Church!

Faith In Surrender (BG)

August 15, 2021 • Brad Fenison • James 4:1–12

Jesus sums up the Law and Prophets in four simple words, “Love God, love others” (Matthew 22:40). It sounds simple enough but is tragically difficult to do. Why is this so? James puts it quite simply; our passions are at war within us. Rather than love selflessly, we desire to be served, we struggle for recognition, and wrestle for power and prestige—we judge and condemn rather than walking in humility, filled with mercy and grace. To act in such a manner makes us enemies of God; we cannot love God if we are constantly fighting to sit on His throne. The solution to resisting love of self, or worldliness, is to draw near to God. Proximity to God changes us from the inside out. As we draw near to God, our attitude toward others should also be one of humility. God has not put us on an exalted throne; the way we interact with Him and others reveals what we believe.

Faith In Surrender (WS)

August 15, 2021 • Dave Williams • James 4:1–12

Jesus sums up the Law and Prophets in four simple words, “Love God, love others” (Matthew 22:40). It sounds simple enough but is tragically difficult to do. Why is this so? James puts it quite simply; our passions are at war within us. Rather than love selflessly, we desire to be served, we struggle for recognition, and wrestle for power and prestige—we judge and condemn rather than walking in humility, filled with mercy and grace. To act in such a manner makes us enemies of God; we cannot love God if we are constantly fighting to sit on His throne. The solution to resisting love of self, or worldliness, is to draw near to God. Proximity to God changes us from the inside out. As we draw near to God, our attitude toward others should also be one of humility. God has not put us on an exalted throne; the way we interact with Him and others reveals what we believe.

Faith In Surrender (HP)

August 15, 2021 • Kenan Stolz • James 4:1–12

Jesus sums up the Law and Prophets in four simple words, “Love God, love others” (Matthew 22:40). It sounds simple enough but is tragically difficult to do. Why is this so? James puts it quite simply; our passions are at war within us. Rather than love selflessly, we desire to be served, we struggle for recognition, and wrestle for power and prestige—we judge and condemn rather than walking in humility, filled with mercy and grace. To act in such a manner makes us enemies of God; we cannot love God if we are constantly fighting to sit on His throne. The solution to resisting love of self, or worldliness, is to draw near to God. Proximity to God changes us from the inside out. As we draw near to God, our attitude toward others should also be one of humility. God has not put us on an exalted throne; the way we interact with Him and others reveals what we believe.

What Faith Produces (BG)

August 8, 2021 • Tim Ainley • James 3:13–18

Wisdom comes from God. Our lives, when lived according to His wisdom reflects His character. Jesus Christ is the perfect example of a life lived in full submission to God’s will, displaying heavenly wisdom. A mind fully submitted to God will always seek the true good of others, while a heart ruled by the self seeks the good of self, leading to disorder. If everyone seeks good according to what they themselves determine is good, our ideals inevitably conflict and we clash with one another, either literally or figuratively. James says you have a choice. Are you following wisdom from above? Or are you following that which has come from below—that anti-wisdom—earthly, unspiritual, and demonic, causing strife and conflict. Make your choice. Are you following God’s wisdom, or are you following earthly wisdom?

What Faith Produces (WS)

August 8, 2021 • Dave Williams • James 3:13–18

Wisdom comes from God. Our lives, when lived according to His wisdom reflects His character. Jesus Christ is the perfect example of a life lived in full submission to God’s will, displaying heavenly wisdom. A mind fully submitted to God will always seek the true good of others, while a heart ruled by the self seeks the good of self, leading to disorder. If everyone seeks good according to what they themselves determine is good, our ideals inevitably conflict and we clash with one another, either literally or figuratively. James says you have a choice. Are you following wisdom from above? Or are you following that which has come from below—that anti-wisdom—earthly, unspiritual, and demonic, causing strife and conflict. Make your choice. Are you following God’s wisdom, or are you following earthly wisdom?

What Faith Produces (HP)

August 8, 2021 • Kyle Wetzler • James 3:13–18, James 1:5–6, Psalm 111:10, 1 Corinthians 1:26–31, Genesis 3:6

Wisdom comes from God. Our lives, when lived according to His wisdom reflects His character. Jesus Christ is the perfect example of a life lived in full submission to God’s will, displaying heavenly wisdom. A mind fully submitted to God will always seek the true good of others, while a heart ruled by the self seeks the good of self, leading to disorder. If everyone seeks good according to what they themselves determine is good, our ideals inevitably conflict and we clash with one another, either literally or figuratively. James says you have a choice. Are you following wisdom from above? Or are you following that which has come from below—that anti-wisdom—earthly, unspiritual, and demonic, causing strife and conflict. Make your choice. Are you following God’s wisdom, or are you following earthly wisdom?

Faith In Our Speech (WS)

August 1, 2021 • Kenan Stolz • James 3:1–12

In a world filled with hurtful speech, God speaks a better Word. God invites His people to use words which match what they believe. Proverbs 18:21 tells us: “Death and life are in the power of the tongue.” There is power in our speech. We proclaim with our mouths that Jesus is Lord and we confess our sin to one another. Why? Our words reveal who or what we worship; they are truly a window into the depth of our heart. Therefore, our words and actions should be in alignment with what we say we believe. We simply cannot love God and curse His children, who are made in the very image of God. No one can fully control their tongue; we all fail. But there is hope! Through the power of the Holy Spirit, we can bring our tongues under submission. As we allow the Spirit to transform us, our desires to use our words to praise and uplift increase as we grow in thankfulness and as a result our faith is strengthened.

Faith In Our Speech (HP)

August 1, 2021 • Kyle Wetzler • James 3:1–12

In a world filled with hurtful speech, God speaks a better Word. God invites His people to use words which match what they believe. Proverbs 18:21 tells us: “Death and life are in the power of the tongue.” There is power in our speech. We proclaim with our mouths that Jesus is Lord and we confess our sin to one another. Why? Our words reveal who or what we worship; they are truly a window into the depth of our heart. Therefore, our words and actions should be in alignment with what we say we believe. We simply cannot love God and curse His children, who are made in the very image of God. No one can fully control their tongue; we all fail. But there is hope! Through the power of the Holy Spirit, we can bring our tongues under submission. As we allow the Spirit to transform us, our desires to use our words to praise and uplift increase as we grow in thankfulness and as a result our faith is strengthened.

Faith In Our Speech (BG)

August 1, 2021 • Jon Siebert • James 3:1–12

In a world filled with hurtful speech, God speaks a better Word. God invites His people to use words which match what they believe. Proverbs 18:21 tells us: “Death and life are in the power of the tongue.” There is power in our speech. We proclaim with our mouths that Jesus is Lord and we confess our sin to one another. Why? Our words reveal who or what we worship; they are truly a window into the depth of our heart. Therefore, our words and actions should be in alignment with what we say we believe. We simply cannot love God and curse His children, who are made in the very image of God. No one can fully control their tongue; we all fail. But there is hope! Through the power of the Holy Spirit, we can bring our tongues under submission. As we allow the Spirit to transform us, our desires to use our words to praise and uplift increase as we grow in thankfulness and as a result our faith is strengthened.

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