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08 Do Textual Variants Support Heb. 8:9 Quote of Jer. 31:32?

Was God a "Husband" to Israel or Did He "Not Care" for Israel?

Christina R Darlington • Video 8: Is Christianity the Mormonism of Judaism?

At Hebrews 8:9, we read a discussion of the New Covenant found at Jeremiah 31:32. Although the majority of Hebrew's Greek citation of Jeremiah's New Covenant follows the text of the Jewish Bible's rendering of the passage, notable differences arise when the Hebrew word ba‘altî for "husband" is translated as ēmelēsa for "disregarded" or "I did not care for" them in the Hebrews 8:9 quote of Jeremiah 31:32. Consulting the Greek Septuagint, we find the same Greek word ēmelēsa contained within its text of Jeremiah. Thus, scholars assume that this reading found in the New Testament is based upon the Jewish Greek Septuagint's rendering of the passage as many other unique citations from the Old Testament bear striking resemblance to the Septuagint's influence as the primary Bible of the early Christian Church. Yet, Jewish rabbis disagree that this passage has any support in textual variants of the Old Testament manuscripts. In this video, we will examine their claims in light of the textual diversity found in the translations of this passage that support the Hebrew 8:9 quotation of this passage.

Introduction: Is Christianity the Mormonism of Judaism? What is Noahidism?

What is the B'nei Noach Faith of Noahidism? • Christina R Darlington

Jewish Rabbis claim that Christianity has distorted the teachings of Judaism in the same way that Mormonism distorts the teachings of Christianity. Are these claims that Orthodox Jewish rabbis make against the Christian religion valid? What is the B'nei Noach religion of Noahidism? How do these non-Jewish, Gentile followers of Rabbinic Judaism practice the religion of Judaism? What are the 7 Laws of Noah? How do the teachings of these anti-Christian Jewish missionaries compare to the teachings of ancient Judaism?

01 Is Isaiah 53 Messiah or Israel?

Is the Suffering Servant of Isaiah 53 the Messiah or the Nation of Israel? • Christina R Darlington

Isaiah 53 is one of the most disputed passages of Scripture among the rabbis of the Jewish community. Early rabbinic Judaism saw shadows of a suffering Messiah while nearly every rabbi since the time of Rashi in the middle ages, has contended that this passage speaks of the suffering of the nation of Israel, rather than of the Messiah Yeshua Jesus. Which interpretation best fits the content and context of Isaiah 53.

02 Did Ancient Rabbis Believe in a Suffering Messiah?

How Ancient Rabbis Interpret Isaiah 53, Psalm 2:7 and Zechariah 12:10 • Christina R Darlington

Today, Jewish rabbis dispute Christian interpretations of Isaiah 53 and other passages by claiming that there is no place in the Jewish Scripture that indicates that the Messiah would suffer and die for humanity. While various interpretations on Isaiah 53 and other Messianic passages abound in the Jewish Talmud, common themes seen in these ancient interpretations disagree with the current rabbinic views of these passages. Not only did the ancient rabbis see a suffering Messiah in several passages of the Old Testament, but these rabbis referred to this Messiah as “Messiah ben Yosef” or “Messiah Son of Joseph” because they saw similarities with Joseph suffering in Egypt when he was rejected by his brothers. When it came to Zechariah 12:10, these ancient rabbis even saw a Messiah who was pierced to the point of death, prior to the coming of the kingly Messiah who they called the “Messiah ben David” or “Messiah Son of David.” In this video, we examine the claims of these ancient rabbis and show beyond a shadow of a doubt that the current Christian interpretation of these passages in the Old Testament is consistent with ancient Judaism, and thus Christianity is not the Mormonism of Judaism.