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CWTF Highlighting and Supporting Indigenous Womens Sacred Ties to their Homelands and Culture as a P

July 6, 2022 • Rose “Loke” Pettigrew, Christopher Foley

In close collaboration with our National Partners, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) developed a Six Point Action Plan, see link. Point Six recognizes that both land and Indigenous women are sacred and connected, and that both require legislative and policy actions to protect them from extractive industries and corporate interests, such as the passage of the Save Oak Flat legislation, HR 1884/S.915. In this CWTF, the NIWRC policy team cordially invites you to have a focused discussion about the direct correlation of land and sacred sites with the safety of Indigenous women and culture as a protective factor. The CTWF will also include important discussions around creating an action plan highlighting the concrete steps you plan to take to support Indigenous communities into the future. About the Speaker: Rose “Loke” Pettigrew moved from the island of Oahu to the island of Molokai 31 years ago to live on the land where her kupuna (elders/ancestors) lived during ancient times. She stayed home raise her two children and when her youngest keiki (child) started school, she took classes at the local community college. Rose is a social service assistant with the Family Court of the Second Court, State of Hawaii. She’s worked for The Judiciary on Molokai for 21 years. She is also a DV advocate at the only DV shelter on the island of Molokai. She’s worked at the shelter for nine (9) years providing individual services, case management, support groups, etc. Rose is Pouhana O Na Wahine (Pillar of Women) President of the Board of Directors and Native Hawaiian Domestic Violence Advocate.

Uplifting the Indigenous LGBTQ2S+ Community through Indigenous Empowerment and Intimate Partner Viol

June 23, 2022 • Charlie Amáyá Scott

This presentation is an introductory webinar on how the cisgender and heterosexual community can be more supportive of the LGBTQ2S+ community and proactive in IPV prevention. This prevention will also highlight how Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is intimately and intricately connected to colonial violence against Indigenous Peoples. Charlie Amáyá Scott will also share their understanding of Indigenous feminism and how we, as Indigenous relatives, can be allies in preventing IPV against our LGBTQ2S+ relatives. Speaker Bio: Charlie Amáyá Scott is a Diné (Navajo) scholar born and raised within the central part of the Navajo Nation. Charlie reflects, analyzes, and critiques what it means to be Queer, Trans, and Diné in the 21st century on their personal blog, dineaesthetics.com, while inspiring joy and justice to thousands on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok. They are a doctoral student at the University of Denver with research interests in the intricacies and intimacies of settler colonialism, social media, and higher education.

Introduction to STTARS: Safety, Training, and Technical Assistance, Resources and Support, the Indig

June 28, 2022 • Caroline LaPorte, Gwendolyn Packard

STTARS- Indigenous Safe Housing Center at NIWRC was created to address the intersection of housing instability/homelessness and domestic violence. This session will introduce the Center, the importance of our work, our approach, and upcoming events and activities. We will provide information about the National Workgroup for Safe Housing for American Indians and Alaska Native Survivors of Gender-Based Violence and share copies of the report. Our vision is “Safe Housing for All Our Relatives.”

Using International Law to Respond to VAIW and the MMIWG Crisis

May 4, 2022 • Chris Foley and Jana Walker

The MMIW crisis in America is not just the result of the failures of our criminal justice system, it is a result of systemic violations of indigenous women’s human rights. The presentation will review the international legal framework applicable to MMIW and other forms of violence committed against indigenous women. We will look closely at the two key human rights instruments that are specific to indigenous peoples—the UN and American Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Both Declarations create minimum legal standards and obligations that countries must observe in their dealings with indigenous peoples. The rights affirmed in these Declarations include the right of self-determination, rights to lands and resources, and the right of indigenous women and children to be protected against violence. We will also discuss how recent actions by the UN Human Rights Council recognizing the human right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment can impact our work in this field. Finally, the session will share information about the work Native women, tribes, and organizations have done using the international and regional human rights systems to advance indigenous women’s rights and offer information about how you can get involved in these efforts.

Spotlight Alaska and the Crisis of MMIWG 2022

May 3, 2022

A focused panel discussion led by Michelle Demmert on work being done to combat the current crisis of trafficking and MMIWG in Alaska. The panel will highlight AKNWRC’s partnerships with organizations and the collective work they do together utilizing each other’s strengths.We will look at AKNWRC’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: An Action Plan for Alaska Native Communities. The spotlight will also look at state and federal law and policy that affect the crisis of MMIWG and innovative work happening in Alaska.

Voices Rising: Uplifting Native Hawaiian Women Survivors and Victims Missing or Murdered

May 2, 2022

Nā leo mana: Paepae ʻia Nā Wahine Maoli Nā mea ola o ka ʻino weliweli kūloko ʻohana pau pū me nā luapoʻi nalowale a i ʻole make This webinar will give a voice to survivors, fallen victims and their ohana as Missing and Murdered Native Hawaiian Women remains a form of violence and oppression that was introduced and implemented by foreigners or non-Native Hawaiians to control and silence Native Hawaiian women. Furthermore, we will share how prostitution and sex trafficking negatively impacts the Hawaiian community by sexualizing cultural practices and viewing women as property, which is not a belief held by Native Hawaiians.

Traditional Opening & National Briefing: Addressing the Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Wo

April 29, 2022

Join NIWRC, our partners, and families of missing and murdered Indigenous women as we start our National Week of Action with our prayers for healing, safety, and justice for Indigenous women, our families and nations. Our prayers root us firmly in our Indigenous identities, customs and traditions that have survived and thrive in the face of colonization and genocide. Our prayers ensure we honor Indigenous women who are respected and held sacred within our nations and have been missing and/or been murdered. Our prayers also guide our advocacy to remove the systemic barriers and restore women’s sacred status. The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) invites you to learn more about the complex and ongoing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) crisis. The current systemic response to violence against Native women is inadequate and the rate at which we are losing our women is devastating to our tribal communities and to the Nation as a whole. Insufficient resources and lack of clarity on jurisdictional responsibilities have exacerbated efforts to locate those who are missing. The federal Indian legal framework is complex and creates many barriers for victims and Tribes working to protect their citizens. Moreover, resources are scarce and culturally appropriate services are practically non-existent. Please join us as we listen to victim-survivors and family members, victim service providers, Tribal judges, and members of Congress discuss national policy issues and recommendations in support of Tribal Nations to enhance safety for Native women.

The Effects of Climate Change on Gender Based Violence and Indigenous Communities

April 6, 2022 • Gwendolyn Packard, Faith Spotted Eagle

Rape, domestic violence, trafficking and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: Several new studies clearly show that climate change plays a critical role in the increase of gender-based violence across our Earth Mother. A recent report by CARE found that “in most disasters, women and girls are worst affected.” This is especially true in developing countries and Indigenous communities. Climate change will continue to spur weather-related disasters, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, droughts, extreme weather, and other consequences, and it will lead to higher rates of violence. In responding to the alarming increase in climate change, it is important to understand the connections to gender-based violence in addressing the future of our planet. The fight against climate change should not only be a struggle for the future of our planet, but it is also an urgent call to address the safety and well-being of our women and girls. Please join us for this timely and critical webinar discussion with Faith Spotted Eagle as we prioritize the impact of the ensuing climate crisis and its interaction with gender-based violence.

Indigenous Water Protectors: In Tribute to World Water Day

March 22, 2022 • Caroline LaPorte, Gwendolyn Packard

World Water Day has been held every year since 1993 on March 22nd. World Water Day celebrates the importance of accessible fresh water and brings awareness to the 2 billion people living on this planet without access to safe water. World Water Day is about taking action to tackle the global water crisis and to advocate for the sustainability for our sacred water resources. As Indigenous people we know that water is life and that all life on this planet depends on it. Please join this important panel presentation and hear from three Indigenous Water Protectors on what they are doing to protect our sacred waters and to see how you can be involved in the protection of one of our most valuable resources. Please join Indigenous Water Protectors, Grandmother Mona Polacca (Hopi/Havasupai/Tewa) chair of the International Council of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers; Sharon Day (Ojibwe) artist, playwright, water walker and activist; and Elder Kathy Sanchez, Wan Povi (Po-Who-Geh-Owingeh), Tewa Women United for this highly informative call to action to end violence against women and girls and our Earth Mother.

Introducing A Tribal Safe Housing Center

March 2, 2022 • Caroline LaPorte, Gwendolyn Packard

The newly established Tribal Safe Housing Center was created to address the intersection of housing instability/homelessness and domestic violence. We invite you to our launch webinar to learn more about the Center and the existing work group, our approach to the work, upcoming events and activities, meet our staff, find out how you can engage in the work of the Center and request training and technical assistance, and hear from our partners and funders. We look forward to sharing space with you as we work towards our vision of “Safe Housing for All Our Relatives.”

Rez Dating

February 16, 2022 • Lexie James

In recognition of national Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center is inviting you to join this webinar to learn about what “teen dating" violence is, why it happens and where to go for help if you or a friend are experiencing it. Discussion will include the intersection of intergenerational trauma and the modern occurrence of dating and intimate partner violence in Indian Country. Exploring healthy relationships and boundaries from an indigenous perspective is also an important part of this presentation. The presenter, Lexie James, young Hopi activist, will share her lived experience and how she navigated them.

Opening Those Closed Doors

December 10, 2021

The celebration of life for Tillie Black Bear, the founding grandmother of the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC), on the same day has Human Rights Day Dec. 10, 2021 is only appropriate. The NIWRC has dedicated a Research Poem to the late Tillie Black Bear in her honor to uplift her advocacy for Indigenous Women’s Human Rights on violence against women, in her testimony from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights January 19, 1978. Tillie Black Bear spoke of awareness, activism and recommendations for the epidemic of violence towards our women are still unfortunately very relevant in today’s time. As part of the research framework used for development, please view the video poem.

LGBTQ2S Policies and Practices for Tribal Domestic Violence Programs and Shelters

June 16, 2021 • Honor Fisher and Leanne Guy

Domestic violence doesn’t happen only in heterosexual relationships, it happens to individuals of all sexual orientations and genders. In fact, within the LGBTQ community, intimate partner violence occurs at a rate equal to or even higher than that of the heterosexual community. In addition, LGBTQ individuals may experience other forms of domestic violence and additional barriers to seeking help due to fear of discrimination or bias. Although the response to LGBTQ victims of domestic violence is gradually improving, there is still much work to be done. Please join us for this important webinar to learn how the Southwest Indigenous Women’s Coalition (SWIWC) is working to improve the tribal response to LGBTQ victim/survivors for tribal domestic violence programs and shelters. SWIWC formed a Native LGBTQ2S Advisory Council to educate, support, and empower Native communities to increase awareness, safety, healing, justice and resources for the LGBTQ community. The Council works to advise and guide tribal programs on training and technical assistance (T/TA) approaches, data inclusion, resource development, policy development and tribal and on-site trainings with activities that come directly from the voices and presence of the LGBTQ community. Please join Leanne Guy (Dine’), Executive Director of SWIWC and Honor Fisher (Mohave-Chemehuevi) former co-chair of the Native LGBTQ2S Advisory Council to learn more about how we can make our programs more accessible and responsive to LGBTQ2S victim/survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking.

NIWRC 10-Year Anniversary: Carrying Our Medicine Forward - A Decade of Lifting the Movement of Safet

November 17, 2021

This fall, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) will mark its 10-year anniversary and re-dedicate our commitment to strengthening tribal responses to safety for Native women and their children. This webinar showcases NIWRC’s support of the Indigenous movement for safety for Native women, including historical milestones and accomplishments of our technical assistance and training, resource development, and policy and systems engagement. Hear highlights of our advocacy over the past decade and reflections from our staff, board, and partners in this celebratory webinar. Learn how you can support the movement for safety for Native women and get involved with NIWRC's work to strengthen roots and plant seeds for change.

Tillie Black Bear Women Are Sacred Day Webinar

October 1, 2021

This celebratory webinar is dedicated to Tillie Black Bear, Wa Wokiye Win (Woman Who Helps Everyone), for her contributions to end violence against women in the United States and across Indigenous Nations. We recognize Unci Tillie as a founding grandmother of our movement. She gave hope and healing to generations of survivors, advocates, and Native Americans by her dedication to organizing the Violence Against Women Movement. Unci Tillie inspired thousands from all walks of life, from community to national levels, to end domestic violence and sexual violence. This webinar will highlight movement milestones to end domestic violence, including foundational legal reforms. Speakers will share Indigenous approaches to current organizing efforts to address systemic barriers to the safety of Indigenous women, specifically, the process of healing and the essential role of Indigenous relationships to the land, family, and lifeways. In celebrating the legacy of Unci Tillie, we re-dedicate our commitment to ending domestic violence by recognizing the need for increasing Indigenous shelter options and grassroots advocacy to support survivors. This October 1, as we launch Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we are excited to celebrate Unci Tillie’s life's work to end domestic violence through a Tillie Black Bear, National Women Are Sacred Day.

Restore, Uplift, Ignite—Restoring Matriarchy, Uplifting Survivor’s Voices and Igniting Spaces of Hea

September 15, 2021 • Kristin Welch

Kristin Welch with the Waking Women Healing Institute Inc., will share how they are building culturally founded, sheltered places of learning to increase wellness, prevent acts of colonial violence such as: sexual assault, human trafficking, resource extraction, MMIW, and how we heal. In this presentation participants will gain an understanding of Matriarchal and Land-Based services, Eco Systems of Care, and how to utilize the power of the collective to uplift survivor voices and build future Indigenous leaders.

Enhancing Tribal/State Relations to Support and Strengthen Tribal Domestic Violence Programs and She

August 11, 2021 • Desireé Coyote, Diana Fleming

In 2006, the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) established a joint formula for the equitable distribution of non-competitive federal and state grants. This joint formula funding is the result of a previously conducted study entitled, “A Funding Towards Equity: Oregon Sexual and Domestic Violence Programs” that provides funding across the state. In 2012, the nine federally recognized tribes were added to the formula. In 2018 and 2020, additional changes to the formula led to allocation increases for tribal programs. Allocations increased from $40,000 to $240,000 for each tribe every two years. This important webinar will focus on the ground-breaking work that followed the study, including: • the funding formula; • results of the equity allocation study; • recommended changes to the formula in 2019 by joint subcommittee; • outcomes from the "Listening Tour"; • community collaboration; • respect for tribal sovereignty and the; • critical need for resources, support and services for victim/survivors.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls National Day of Action: Uplifting the Voices of MMIW

May 5, 2021 • MMIW Family Advisory Members

The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) invites you to join us to honor missing and murdered Indigenous women and uplift the voices of surviving family members. In some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates more than 10 times the national average. In responding to this national crisis, we recognize the federal Indian legal framework is complex and creates many barriers for victims, their families, communities, and tribal nations. Insufficient resources and lack of clarity on jurisdictional responsibilities have exacerbated efforts to locate those who are missing By learning from the experiences of surviving family members, the movement can work to achieve the changes needed to safeguard the lives of Indigenous women and strengthen the authority of Indian nations to protect their citizens Over the last decade, awareness of this national issue has increased, but more must be done to stop disappearances and save lives Please join us as we honor missing and murdered Indigenous women, increase our national awareness, and demand change at the tribal, federal, and state levels.

Spotlight Alaska and the Crisis of MMIWG

May 4, 2021 • Debra O’Gara, Charlene Aqpik Apok, Amber Webb

A focused panel discussion with Debra O’Gara on initiatives in the State of Alaska, bringing more targeted attention to the crisis of MMIWG and different efforts to both raise awareness and to highlight information in the report just released, “We are calling you,” a baseline report created by Data for Indigenous Justice authors Dr. Charlene Aqpik Apok, Malia Villegas, Abigail Echo-Hawk, and Jody Juneby Potts. This discussion also highlights Amber Webb’s beautiful Kuspuk project that has honored and given breath to those women and girls who have gone missing or have been murdered. This spotlight calls for the importance of federal and state recognition of tribal authority and allocation of resources to develop village-based responses to prevent MMIWG.

Na Hanauna Hoola (Healing Generations)

May 3, 2021 • NaniFay Paglinawan, Rose "Loke" Pettigrew, Dr. Dayna Schultz, Dolly Tatofi

Hosted by the Pouhana O Na Wahine (Pillars of Women) This webinar will explore the impact of trauma and violence towards Native Hawaiian women in our communities as a result of the U.S. overthrow of our government and forced statehood. The resulting oppression of Native Hawaiians has been devastating to the health and well-being of our people who have been a thriving people that lived as part of the land, sea, and sky. The introduction of alcohol and drugs exacerbated the violence and separated Hawaiians from their very being and displaced their families. We will also address the importance of healing from the pain and past injustices by acknowledging in the present that we are evolving and once again will become a thriving people. It is important for us to share our culture, values, and belief systems that were passed down to us by our ancestors. Recent reports on intimate partner violence, sexual assault and sex trafficking, dictate a need in Hawaii for a Native Hawaiian Domestic Violence Resource Center, and it is Pouhana O Na Wahine’s intention to be the ones to open the center in Hawaii.

Using International Law to Respond to the MMIW Crisis

April 30, 2021 • Chris Foley and Jana Walker

The MMIW crisis in America is not just the result of failures of our criminal justice system, it is a result of systemic violations of indigenous women’s human rights. The presentation will review the international legal framework applicable to MMIW and other forms of gender-based violence committed against indigenous women. We will look closely at the two key human rights instruments that are specific to indigenous peoples—the UN and American Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Both Declarations create legal standards and obligations that countries must observe in their dealings with indigenous peoples. The rights affirmed in these Declarations include the right of self-determination, rights to lands and resources, and the right of indigenous women and children to be protected against violence. Finally, the session will share information about the work Native women, tribes, and organizations have done using the international human rights system to advance indigenous women’s rights and offer information about how you can get involved in these efforts.

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