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From Pharisee to Tax Collector

October 27, 2019 • David Hammerslag

It is the state of our souls, not our words or actions that justify us before God, and in Jesus' famous parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector, the Pharisee’s central problem is that he does not know his own heart. He trusts in his own righteousness and is too easily critical of others. How do we know ourselves truly? We can only really know ourselves in community. But as long as we don't risk relationship, we can sell ourselves all kinds of false ideas of what we're really like while ignoring the magnitude of our narcissism.

More from 2019 Messages

What Did You Get For Christmas?

December 29, 2019 • David Hammerslag

Christmas has come and gone. We may have overlooked the true value of God's gift of Love. God's gift of love through his Son has incredible value in its own right, but it is not meant for us to keep for ourselves. It is meant to transform us so that we can be transformed by it and love others with the same outrageous extravagant love given to us.

The Supernatural & the Scent of Rain

December 22, 2019 • Graeme Sellers

The scent of rain and Advent itself are impossible to understand apart from the reality of the supernatural. Scent of rain doesn’t just happen — it is caused by Someone, caused supernaturally. Two supernatural aspects of the Jesus' birth narrative integral and normative to the Christian life are prophecy and angelic activity, and both them can bring the scent of rain. Once you start looking for it, the supernatural is almost impossible to miss in the Christmas story – it’s everywhere: dreams, words, angels, visions, prophecy.

The Girl Who Caught the Scent of Rain

December 15, 2019 • Graeme Sellers

Mary is the girl who caught the scent of rain. And she changed the world as a result. Before anyone else, she sees and announces Jesus’ mission. If any person ever fit the description of being the dangerous kind, Mary does; she’s dangerous because she knows the identity of her son and because she begins to tell his story—and no one is more dangerous than those who tell his story.