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Picking Sides

Luke 11:14-36

October 18, 2020 • Andrew Murch

As we move our way through the gospel according to Luke, this week feels like a hodge-podge of random and disconnected moments in Jesus’ ministry. We just came from such iconic moments like Jesus’ time with Mary and Martha and teaching his disciples how to pray. But what in the world is going on in this week's text? People think Jesus is demon-possessed, he gives us a lesson about demons, rebukes a lady for calling his mom blessed, talks about Jonah and the Queen of Sheba, and then ends on some teaching about light. Jesus, what are you talking about? This week, we find out!

How OUGHT we to live?

Luke 13:10-21 • November 29, 2020 • Bill Clem

This week we close out the fourth installment of The Gospel According to Luke. In this section of Luke's account, we read about Jesus healing a woman on the Sabbath and then teaching his followers about the kingdom of God with two comparisons.

Watching the News with Jesus

Luke 13:1-9 • November 22, 2020 • Sam Cassese

This week, we read as Jesus continues his discourse by calling the surrounding crowd to turn away from their sins. When listeners in the crowd ask Jesus about a recent event in Galilee, Jesus corrects their thinking and reminds them that Israel needs to repent. Jesus then teaches the crowd about Israel’s need to repent and bear fruit through the Parable of the Barren Fig Tree. Here, Jesus compares Israel to the barren tree and he makes it clear that time is running out for Israel to bear real fruit. Altogether, Luke 13:1-9 shows us that the answer to Jesus’ call to remain vigilant and faithful is to repent and bear fruit.

Luke 12:35-59

Luke 12:35-59 • November 15, 2020 • Jake Gamble

As we continue in Jesus’ address to his disciples and the surrounding crowds, we read of Jesus warning his followers to remain vigilant. There is no question about it... Jesus is coming back soon! So, how will that reality change the way we live now? Jesus exhorts his followers to “stay dressed for action” and “be like men who are waiting for their master.” It is in this season of waiting that we are to be like faithful servants who continue to carry out their tasks despite the unknown of when their master will return. This passage reveals Jesus’ continuing anticipation for his coming suffering and instructs on how we are to live as God’s people while on this earth.