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Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls - National Day of Action

May 5, 2020

During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the inclusion of the “Safety for Indian Women” title within the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over the last decade awareness of this national issue has increased but more must be done to stop disappearances and save lives. Please join us on May 5th, 2020, as we honor missing and murdered Indigenous women and together increase our national awareness and demand change at the tribal, federal and state levels.

More from Advocate!

Disaster Planning for Tribal Domestic Violence Programs and Shelters

April 15, 2020 • Chele Rider and Tim Zientek

When disaster strikes, are you prepared? This webinar will focus on how we, as tribal domestic violence programs and shelters can prepare and insure our ability to conduct business after a disaster strikes. It will not only address personal preparedness, but important information on how to continue critical operations of tribal domestic violence programs. It will provide emergency management tips to help tribal domestic violence programs be prepared for future disasters and continue the vital role you play in our communities: Protecting our Relatives! Presenter: Tim Zientek (Citizen Potowatomi Nation) Emergency Manager Chele Rider (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) Disaster State Relations Director, American Red Cross Tribal Relations Lead

ICWA andVAWA PreservingTribalSovereigntytoProtectourWomenandChildren

April 20, 2016 • Mary Kathryn

Both the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Violence Against Women Act tribal jurisdiction provision (section 904) recognize the inherent sovereignty of Indian Nations to protect their women and children. However, both are under attack. This webinar will take a close look at the non-Indian attacks on ICWA and VAWA, how they intersect, and what lessons we can learn from defending these attacks to ensure that our own communities best utilize these important laws to protect our women and children.

Women Are Sacred: Exploring Women's Spirituality from an Indigenous Perspective

March 18, 2020 • Cheryl Neskahi Coan, Amanda Takes War Bonnett, Rose “Loke” Pettigrew

This webinar provides a rare opportunity to reflect upon the meaning of the sacredness of women. Especially, in the face of the impact of colonization and modern day levels of violence against native women, how do we, as indigenous women, experience, understand, nurture and protect our sacredness? What are some of our traditional practices and teachings that can help us embrace indigenous women’s spirituality to decolonize, help each other heal and revitalize our sacredness? Presenters: Cheryl Neskahi Coan, Amanda Takes War Bonnett, Rose “Loke” Pettigrew