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Coming Together to Address Human Trafficking in Native Communities

April 26, 2017 • Jenna Novak and Lisa Heth

More from Advocate!

Indigenizing VAWA and VOCA Through Tribal Grassroots Organizing and Movement Building

May 18, 2018 • Virginia Davis, Juana Majel-Dixon, Caroline LaPorte, and Jacqueline Agtuca

This webinar will provide updates on recent VAWA reauthorization efforts and the importance of continued advocacy for a permanent VOCA fix for a dedicated tribal funding stream under the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). While a historic victory was achieved by the provision of tribal funding under the CVF in the FY 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, the Department of Justice is pressed to award $133 million to Indian tribes before September 30, 2018. Discussion will also focus on concerns and challenges the timing of this award presents for tribes. Tribal grassroots organizing efforts have been and will continue to play a pivotal role in ensuring changes made in federal laws and policies are rooted in the needs and experiences of tribal victims/survivors and tribal governments. Please join NCAI VAW Task Force Co-Chairs and facilitators from NCAI and NIWRC for a discussion of these critically important matters, which will continue through the NCAI Violence Against Women Task Force Meeting at Midyear in Kansas City, Missouri.

Safety for Native Women: VAWA 101 Primer

April 30, 2018 • Caroline LaPorte and Jacqueline Agtuca

In 2013, the Violence Against Women Act was reauthorized. This reauthorization included new amendments that directly impacted tribal communities and victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence and stalking. This webinar will give an overview of Title IX of the Violence Against Women Act. Facilitators, Jacqueline Agtuca and Caroline LaPorte will go through Title IX section by section to provide tribal coalitions with a foundational review of VAWA Title IX, including important consultation mandates and processes for change.

Transforming Care in Tribal Communities for Sexual Assault Survivors Through Partnership and Technol

April 18, 2018 • Joan Meunier-Sham and Carey Onsae

For many remote Indian communities, it often is difficult to create, develop and sustain trauma-informed and culturally appropriate services and resources as part of a health response for Indigenous women who have been sexually violated. Sexual assault nurse examiners (SANE) have specialized training, education, and experience in providing quality forensic medical examinations and patient-centered care to survivors. Given high medical staff turnover, it is challenging to keep SANE nurses on staff in tribal community health care facilities. Join us for this webinar to learn how the National TeleNursing Center, Hopi Health Care Center, National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, and Hopi-Tewa Women’s Coalition to End Abuse are working effectively in partnership to respond using telemedicine to the needs of victims of sexual assault living on tribal lands with limited resources.