Restoration of Family Values and Healthy Community Characteristics

September 23, 2015

More from Advocate!

Operation Firefly: Bringing Our Relatives Home

October 25, 2017 • Sunrise Black Bull, LeToy Lunderman

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe was one of the first tribes in the country selected to participate in the Defending Childhood Initiative, raising awareness about children’s exposure to violence. A youth group, born out of this initiative, visited the Carlisle Indian School several years ago. They were shocked to see Sicangu names on some of the headstones in the cemetery. They wanted to bring their relatives home and thus began a long journey of repatriation to identify, remove and re-bury the remains of at least 10 Native American children who died more than a century ago at Carlisle Indian school. Carlisle is a government-run boarding school in Pennsylvania whose mission was to strip the students from their traditions and replace them with European culture. Please join this important webinar presentation by advocates from the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society (WBCWS) and members of the WBCWS youth group as they share their powerful story, a story that speaks to the roots of violence, especially intimate partner violence, in our communities and the strength, courage and vision of our youth in promoting health and healing. [The White Buffalo Calf Woman Society (WBCWS) shelter in Mission SD provides services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. WBCWS is one of the oldest tribal domestic violence programs in the country.] Presented by Sunrise Black Bull & LeToy Lunderman, Advocates WBCS, members of the youth group and will be facilitated by Gwendolyn Packard, NIWRC Training & Technical Assistance Specialist.

Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Women 2017: Why Attendance of Indian Tribes Is Urgent

September 25, 2017 • Virginia Davis, Juana Majel, Jacqueline Agtuca, Dorma Sahneyah

VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women. Tribal Title, Section 903 Tribal Consultation Mandate The Tribal Consultation Mandate is found in Title IX. Safety for Indian Women §903. It specifically directs the Attorney General, Secretary of HHA and Secretary of Interior to conduct an annual consultation with Indian tribal governments concerning the federal administration of tribal funds and programs established under the Violence Against Women Act. During such consultations, DOJ, HHS, and DOI are required to solicit recommendations from Indian tribes concerning three specific areas: (1) Administering tribal funds and programs (2) Enhancing the safety of Indian women from domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking (3) Strengthening the federal response to such violent crimes In addition to these three general topics, the agencies also often release “framing papers” or consultation questions in advance of the consultation. Those have not yet been distributed, but we will circulate them as soon as they become available. 12th Annual Government to Government On Violence Against Women Tribal Consultation: When: October 3-4, 2017 Where: We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center, Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Fountain Hills, AZ For more information go to: https://www.justice.gov/ovw/tribal-consultation and logistical information will be available soon at: http://ovwconsultation.org

Reviving the Movement: Voices of Advocates

August 22, 2017 • Karen Artichoker & Eileen Hudon

Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of Indigenous advocates who have helped create, shape, and grow this powerful movement to end violence against Indian women and children in tribal communities. Following this webinar presentation you are invited to reflect and share your insights and the work going forward, including challenges, successes, lessons learned, contributions, and our legacy in this global movement. Facilitated by Gwendolyn Packard, Training & Technical Assistance Specialist, NIWRC