Domestic Violence and Housing Across Tribal Nations, Alaska Native Villages and Indian Communities

December 14, 2017 • Debbie Fox, Caroline LaPorte, Monica McLaughlin, Rose Quilt

This webinar will provide an overview of the current federal laws in place regarding shelter and housing in Indian Country and the responsibilities expressly outlined in the Violence Against Women Act. The webinar will also focus on the disparity in tribal housing and shelter in Native communities; will review ONAP’s recent report; and will give an overview of why victims of abuse need access to housing as a matter of survival. Participants will learn about HUD’s final rule and its application to Indian Country housing and shelter options. This webinar will also explore culturally responsive best promising practices to promote safe housing options for American Indian and Alaska Natives.

Effective Use of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for Case Resolution

December 13, 2017 • BJ Spamer

The number of missing and unidentified persons in the United States poses one of the biggest challenges to law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners tasked with resolving these important cases. The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national information clearinghouse and resource center which offers technology, forensic services, and investigative support to help resolve cases. Funded by the National Institute of Justice and managed through a cooperative agreement with the UNT Health Science Center, NamUs offers all services at no cost to agencies or families of the missing. The online NamUs databases are accessible to all, with secure case information accessible only to registered and vetted criminal justice users. Forensic odontology and fingerprint examination are offered through NamUs to support case comparisons, and DNA analyses and forensic anthropology services are offered through affiliated UNT Center for Human Identification laboratories. This webinar will focus on how technology can be a valuable resource to tribal nations working to build their capacity to respond to missing and murdered Indigenous peoples, and case studies will be provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the NamUs databases and forensic services.

Tribal Resource Tool: Resources for Survivors of Crime and Abuse

December 12, 2017 • Bonnie Clairmont, Concetta Tsosie de Haro, and Samantha Wauls

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest crime victimization rates in the nation and often have difficulty connecting with victim services. AI/AN victims of crime face additional challenges such as navigating complex jurisdiction barriers and a dearth of culturally appropriate services, both on and off tribal lands. On January 1, 2016, the Office for Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice funded the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), and the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) to work together and create a web-based tribal resource mapping tool that would link AI/AN victim/survivors of crime to tribal victim services anywhere in the country. The project was designed to also help identify gaps in the network of existing services. To achieve these goals, the project partners have convened several events in order to seek input from primary stakeholders from tribal communities about the design and content of the tool. Recently, the official project name was changed to the Tribal Resource Tool: Resources for Survivors of Crime and Abuse. This webinar will focus on the project team’s journey to develop the tool, and be an opportunity for participants to have a first-look at the tool before it launches nationally in 2018.

Operation Firefly: Bringing Our Relatives Home

October 25, 2017 • Sunrise Black Bull, LeToy Lunderman

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe was one of the first tribes in the country selected to participate in the Defending Childhood Initiative, raising awareness about children’s exposure to violence. A youth group, born out of this initiative, visited the Carlisle Indian School several years ago. They were shocked to see Sicangu names on some of the headstones in the cemetery. They wanted to bring their relatives home and thus began a long journey of repatriation to identify, remove and re-bury the remains of at least 10 Native American children who died more than a century ago at Carlisle Indian school. Carlisle is a government-run boarding school in Pennsylvania whose mission was to strip the students from their traditions and replace them with European culture. Please join this important webinar presentation by advocates from the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society (WBCWS) and members of the WBCWS youth group as they share their powerful story, a story that speaks to the roots of violence, especially intimate partner violence, in our communities and the strength, courage and vision of our youth in promoting health and healing. [The White Buffalo Calf Woman Society (WBCWS) shelter in Mission SD provides services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. WBCWS is one of the oldest tribal domestic violence programs in the country.] Presented by Sunrise Black Bull & LeToy Lunderman, Advocates WBCS, members of the youth group and will be facilitated by Gwendolyn Packard, NIWRC Training & Technical Assistance Specialist.

Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Women 2017: Why Attendance of Indian Tribes Is Urgent

September 25, 2017 • Virginia Davis, Juana Majel, Jacqueline Agtuca, Dorma Sahneyah

VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women. Tribal Title, Section 903 Tribal Consultation Mandate The Tribal Consultation Mandate is found in Title IX. Safety for Indian Women §903. It specifically directs the Attorney General, Secretary of HHA and Secretary of Interior to conduct an annual consultation with Indian tribal governments concerning the federal administration of tribal funds and programs established under the Violence Against Women Act. During such consultations, DOJ, HHS, and DOI are required to solicit recommendations from Indian tribes concerning three specific areas: (1) Administering tribal funds and programs (2) Enhancing the safety of Indian women from domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking (3) Strengthening the federal response to such violent crimes In addition to these three general topics, the agencies also often release “framing papers” or consultation questions in advance of the consultation. Those have not yet been distributed, but we will circulate them as soon as they become available. 12th Annual Government to Government On Violence Against Women Tribal Consultation: When: October 3-4, 2017 Where: We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center, Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Fountain Hills, AZ For more information go to: https://www.justice.gov/ovw/tribal-consultation and logistical information will be available soon at: http://ovwconsultation.org

Reviving the Movement: Voices of Advocates

August 22, 2017 • Karen Artichoker & Eileen Hudon

Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of Indigenous advocates who have helped create, shape, and grow this powerful movement to end violence against Indian women and children in tribal communities. Following this webinar presentation you are invited to reflect and share your insights and the work going forward, including challenges, successes, lessons learned, contributions, and our legacy in this global movement. Facilitated by Gwendolyn Packard, Training & Technical Assistance Specialist, NIWRC

Domestic Violence Safety Issues When Meth is Present

May 17, 2017 • Walter Lamar & Lerene Thomas

Honoring Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

May 5th, 2017 as the First National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls • May 5, 2017 • Carmen O'Leary, Cherrah Giles, Christopher Foley, Shirley Moses, Tami Truett Jerue

In 2005, the movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include under the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Indian Women. One of the findings of this title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over the last decade awareness of this national issue has increased but more must be done at all levels to stop the disappearances and save lives. To address an issue it must first be acknowledged. Please join us on May 5th as we honor missing and murdered Indigenous women and together increase our national awareness. Partnering organizations: Alaska Native Women’s Resource Center, Healing Native Hearts Coalition, Indian Law Resource Center, Sacred Hoop Coalition, Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains, National Congress of American Indians.

Protecting the Seventh Generation

IPV, its Effect on our Children, and the Solution of Resiliency • April 28, 2017 • Victoria Sweet, Haley Merrill, Dr. Alaina Szlachta, and Caroline LaPorte

The goal for this webinar is for participants to engage in critical thinking about how their coalition/advocates and communities are actively practicing resiliency with youth who witness or experience domestic violence/intimate partner violence in their homes. Our panel consists of Victoria Sweet from NCJFCJ, Haley Merrill from CASA, Dr. Alaina Szlachta, PHD from NDVH, and Caroline LaPorte from NIWRC.

Coming Together to Address Human Trafficking in Native Communities

April 26, 2017 • Jenna Novak and Lisa Heth

Women Are Sacred: Our Grandmothers Stories and the Movement to Bring Safety to Native Nations

November 19, 2014

Hopi Sexual Assault Tele-Nursing Project: Enhancing Safety for Victims of Sexual Violence

May 4, 2016

Addressing Tribal Victims of Crime

March 30, 2016

Restoration of Family Values and Healthy Community Characteristics

September 23, 2015

Understanding Trauma and Mental Health in the Context of Domestic Violence Advocacy

May 20, 2015

Namelehuapono: Culture and Place-based Healing for Violence Against Native Hawaiian Women

April 15, 2015

Providing a Response to Sexual Violence Remote From the Emergency Room: IHS Four Directions

April 14, 2015

Native Wellness: HIV/AIDS

March 11, 2015

Native Teens: Meeting Them Where They Are and Promoting Their Leadership

February 18, 2015

Effective Social Media Advocacy Strategies

February 17, 2015

Firearms and Tribal Policy

September 30, 2014

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