Reviving the Movement: Voices of Advocates

August 22, 2017 • Karen Artichoker & Eileen Hudon

Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of Indigenous advocates who have helped create, shape, and grow this powerful movement to end violence against Indian women and children in tribal communities. Following this webinar presentation you are invited to reflect and share your insights and the work going forward, including challenges, successes, lessons learned, contributions, and our legacy in this global movement. Facilitated by Gwendolyn Packard, Training & Technical Assistance Specialist, NIWRC

More from Advocate!

Domestic Violence and Housing Across Tribal Nations, Alaska Native Villages and Indian Communities

December 14, 2017 • Debbie Fox, Caroline LaPorte, Monica McLaughlin, Rose Quilt

This webinar will provide an overview of the current federal laws in place regarding shelter and housing in Indian Country and the responsibilities expressly outlined in the Violence Against Women Act. The webinar will also focus on the disparity in tribal housing and shelter in Native communities; will review ONAP’s recent report; and will give an overview of why victims of abuse need access to housing as a matter of survival. Participants will learn about HUD’s final rule and its application to Indian Country housing and shelter options. This webinar will also explore culturally responsive best promising practices to promote safe housing options for American Indian and Alaska Natives.

Effective Use of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for Case Resolution

December 13, 2017 • BJ Spamer

The number of missing and unidentified persons in the United States poses one of the biggest challenges to law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners tasked with resolving these important cases. The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national information clearinghouse and resource center which offers technology, forensic services, and investigative support to help resolve cases. Funded by the National Institute of Justice and managed through a cooperative agreement with the UNT Health Science Center, NamUs offers all services at no cost to agencies or families of the missing. The online NamUs databases are accessible to all, with secure case information accessible only to registered and vetted criminal justice users. Forensic odontology and fingerprint examination are offered through NamUs to support case comparisons, and DNA analyses and forensic anthropology services are offered through affiliated UNT Center for Human Identification laboratories. This webinar will focus on how technology can be a valuable resource to tribal nations working to build their capacity to respond to missing and murdered Indigenous peoples, and case studies will be provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the NamUs databases and forensic services.

Tribal Resource Tool: Resources for Survivors of Crime and Abuse

December 12, 2017 • Bonnie Clairmont, Concetta Tsosie de Haro, and Samantha Wauls

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest crime victimization rates in the nation and often have difficulty connecting with victim services. AI/AN victims of crime face additional challenges such as navigating complex jurisdiction barriers and a dearth of culturally appropriate services, both on and off tribal lands. On January 1, 2016, the Office for Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice funded the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), and the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) to work together and create a web-based tribal resource mapping tool that would link AI/AN victim/survivors of crime to tribal victim services anywhere in the country. The project was designed to also help identify gaps in the network of existing services. To achieve these goals, the project partners have convened several events in order to seek input from primary stakeholders from tribal communities about the design and content of the tool. Recently, the official project name was changed to the Tribal Resource Tool: Resources for Survivors of Crime and Abuse. This webinar will focus on the project team’s journey to develop the tool, and be an opportunity for participants to have a first-look at the tool before it launches nationally in 2018.