NativeLove Project Webinar

February 29, 2016 • Rebbeca Balog, Princella RedCorn, Tara Azure

The NIWRC Native Love youth project tunes into the voices of youth to hear what NativeLove means to them and how it can inform our work as advocates. NativeLove is re-launching during Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month 2016, with media campaigns, tribal school visits, community events, toolkits, building and sharing new resources, how to promote youth leadership, and information about the NativeLove youth ambassadorship. NativeLove hopes to galvanize Native youth and lend volume to their voices in recognizing healthy relationships by engaging them in a positive way with interactive opportunities for youth-to-youth-to-community relationship building. This webinar will describe the project, provide links to growing toolkits for educators and youth advocates, toolkits and resources for youth/teen/college-age students for healthy relationship living; describe promotional materials and share how we connect to youth through media technology; share important learnings from Native youth about their value of weaving old and new traditions for adults who are supporting youth in tribal nation/community/villages; and what is successful and comfortable youth participation. What does Native Love mean to youth? How do we support healthy NativeLove? Let’s visit about it. The NativeLove Top Winner is Kristen Butcher from Cahuilla Nation! Kristen is Lakota of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and an enrolled member of the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Nation in Thermal, California. Faith Morreo, Kristen’s mother shared: “She (Kristen) serves on her Tribal Youth Council of Torres Martinez. Kristen is a champion teen jingle dress dancer as well and believes in keeping her traditions and culture alive! She is learning to speak fluent Desert Cahuilla, as taught by her grandmother, Christina Morreo. She also is a champion teen bird dancer, of our region in Southern California. We are so pleased to hear the great news that she won the NativeLove Challenge!”

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