icon__search

The Comparison Trap

The Thief of Joy

Week 1 • June 3, 2018 • Mark Beeson & Angela Bryant

It’s all too easy to compare our messy reality to someone else’s perfect snapshot—just pick up your phone. Our imperfect homes, families, careers and relationships usually don’t match up to the absurd standards we’ve photoshopped in our minds. And not only is it exhausting trying to keep up with the Jones’—it’s dangerous. There’s no finish line or sense of satisfaction if you’re always pushing yourself to meet a standard that doesn’t really exist. And how can we truly learn to love our neighbors and our friends, if we secretly envy what they have and gloat over their failures? How can we experience true joy and satisfaction, if we’re racking up debt to keep pace with someone else? There’s no win in comparison. It’s a trap. For four weeks, we’re going to bail on the pitfalls of comparison and start living freely.

The Trap of Identity

Week 2 • June 10, 2018 • Mark Beeson & Angela Bryant

It’s all too easy to compare our messy reality to someone else’s perfect snapshot—just pick up your phone. Our imperfect homes, families, careers and relationships usually don’t match up to the absurd standards we’ve photoshopped in our minds. And not only is it exhausting trying to keep up with the Jones’—it’s dangerous. There’s no finish line or sense of satisfaction if you’re always pushing yourself to meet a standard that doesn’t really exist. And how can we truly learn to love our neighbors and our friends, if we secretly envy what they have and gloat over their failures? How can we experience true joy and satisfaction, if we’re racking up debt to keep pace with someone else? There’s no win in comparison. It’s a trap. For four weeks, we’re going to bail on the pitfalls of comparison and start living freely.

The Lure of Keeping Pace

Week 3 • June 16, 2018 • Josh King

It’s all too easy to compare our messy reality to someone else’s perfect snapshot—just pick up your phone. Our imperfect homes, families, careers and relationships usually don’t match up to the absurd standards we’ve photoshopped in our minds. And not only is it exhausting trying to keep up with the Jones’—it’s dangerous. There’s no finish line or sense of satisfaction if you’re always pushing yourself to meet a standard that doesn’t really exist. And how can we truly learn to love our neighbors and our friends, if we secretly envy what they have and gloat over their failures? How can we experience true joy and satisfaction, if we’re racking up debt to keep pace with someone else? There’s no win in comparison. It’s a trap. For four weeks, we’re going to bail on the pitfalls of comparison and start living freely.