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Luke 15:22-32

Sunday Morning Second Service

July 21, 2019 • Ron Arbaugh

"The older son in the parable represents the Pharisees who were muttering under their breath at the beginning of the chapter. But he also represents the Pharisee in all of us. You see, there are still lots of people—in church and out—who think they are somehow good enough to be acceptable to God. ‘I follow the rules.’ ‘I don’t hurt anyone.’ ‘I go to church…’ You get the idea."

More from Luke 2018

Luke 17:1-10

Sunday Morning Second Service • August 18, 2019 • Ron Arbaugh

"He (Jesus) tells His followers (you and me today) that we are to watch/protect ourselves! From what? From falling into the same trap the Pharisees have fallen into. From judging people or imposing our own legalistic standards on others. From... holding on to unforgiveness and from forgetting what the Pharisees had forgotten—that they were servants of God! Every one of us in this room this morning needs never to forget that we are servants and, as such, our job is simply to do what we are told."

Luke 16:19-31

Sunday Morning Third Service • August 11, 2019 • Ron Arbaugh

"I want to begin here this morning by pointing out that the mention of Lazarus by name is how we know this is a real story as opposed to a parable. Jesus never used real names in parables; his point here is obvious… He has tried every way possible to get the attention of the Pharisees. He has been direct. He has used parables to illustrate the truth of His statements. The sneer, however, has not left their faces and Jesus now turns to a real-life example of the exactly what it will cost the Pharisees if they do not repent."

Luke 16:14-18

Sunday Morning First Service • August 4, 2019 • Ron Arbaugh

"The opening statement in our study is frightening (at least it should be). God knows our hearts! Not the one we rationalize sin away with—our real hearts! The Pharisees were sneering because Jesus just nailed them about loving money! We, like the Pharisees, often reject the Word of God because it hits a little too close to home."