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10 - Judging The Judgmental

1 Corinthians 4:1-5

April 18, 2021 • Pastor Ronald H. Gann

In keeping with the idea of judging others and being judged by others, 1 Corinthians 4:1-5 sets forth the guidelines and standards by which true ministers are to be judged by the congregation (and even how the minister is to judge himself). And as Paul implies, popularity, personality, degrees, and the size of the pastor’s church has no bearing on how God judges His ministers, and so those things should not play a role in how we judge our pastors. But how we are to judge, why we are to judge, and who we are to judge must be interpreted properly.

More from 1 Corinthians

28 - Communion: Sanctity vs. Sacrilege

October 17, 2021 • Pastor Ronald H. Gann • 1 Corinthians 11:17–34

The church in Corinth followed the custom of having love feasts. But after an hour or two of eating and drinking, what was supposed to be a spiritual, godly, fellowship meal would turn into a party of alcoholism and excess. This was sacrilegious; an outrageous violation of something sacred. And when it comes to the God of the Bible, He takes a very, very, very, dim view of sacrilege. So much so, in fact, that it’s not beneath Him to actually take the life of a person who commits it—be it a believer or an unbeliever. Sadly, this was something that the Corinthians learned firsthand.

01 - Introduction: Pitfalls Of An Imperfect Church

January 31, 2021 • Pastor Ronald H. Gann

The one theme that drives everything Paul writes in 1 CORINTHIANS is the gospel. One way to define the gospel is that Jesus lived, died, and rose again for sinners and that, through Jesus Christ, God saves those who come to Him in repentance and faith. That's the gospel. That's the good news. And it permeates the entire letter. Christ crucified. Christ risen. Sinners forgiven. The gospel solves every issue Paul addresses in 1 CORINTHIANS.

02 - The Sainthood Of Believers

February 7, 2021 • Pastor Ronald H. Gann

As Christians, we are no longer condemned by God as sinners but are declared holy by God as saints. And since our new nature in Christ is holy, Scripture teaches, our living should be also be holy. That Paul referred to the carnal believers at Corinth as saints gives us hope (since they were anything but saintly in their conduct). It tells us that the title saint has nothing whatsoever to do with one’s spiritual maturity or deeds. Paul called them saints because that’s who the Corinthians were (as well as all believers) by calling and position.